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REVIEW: Breaking Down the Globe Sabbath


Category: Skateboarding
Best for: Street Skating
Star feature: Polyurethane insole
Weight: 429 grams

David Gonzalez suffered an ankle injury in 2011 that made it uncomfortable for him to skate in high tops, so for that reason his newest shoe from Globe, the Sabbath, is a vulcanized low top. He designed it with a clean aesthetic in mind because he felt it would perform better if it was less bulky. That minimalist approach resulted in a shoe that does just what you need it to when you skate: perform and last.

The most noticeable thing about the Sabbath is that there is very little stitching on the upper. This is because of a fusion-weld method used in production which makes the suede tougher to break through. Normally stitches have to be triple-layered for durability and that doesn’t do much, but no matter how aggressively I slid my foot against the griptape I just couldn’t break through the upper. I even delayed this review by a week to see if I could do it and all I did was wear down the sidewall and sole slightly. This may be because I’m not young anymore and don’t skate with the ferocity of teenager, but even Gonzalez said they last him twenty days, so I can’t really be ashamed of myself. If you’ve seen his last video part you can imagine what his shoes go through in twenty days. For the average skater the Sabbath will last you a few months. Or you could be moronic like me and wear yourself out first, trying to prove they can rip. The only thing I managed to damage was the outsole but only in small unnoticeable areas. I didn’t like that the sole wore down, but when I wasn’t examining the bottom of my shoe I didn’t notice any difference in performance.

A unique quality I felt was good for the “old man skater” demographic may have been influenced by Gonzalez’s ankle injury. The tongue is round at the top by design so that it fits right around the front of your ankle. This is something not a lot of skate shoe companies do, but it serves a necessary purpose of reinforcing your ankle on the top and not just on the sides and achilles region. In all my efforts to rip through this shoe I didn’t suffer any ankle rolls or sprains and I credit that to the tongue, which is also made of two kinds of mesh for ventilation. Make sure you lace them up properly to get the full benefits of the tongue’s stabilizing capabilities.

Speaking of support, the insole is made out of polyurethane and it’s designed for punishment. Globe refers to their insoles as “shockbeds,” and that’s a pretty accurate description because your feet don’t hurt when you bail off a big obstacle no matter if you’re still on the board or not. I was about to launch off of a big ledge and I jumped to avoid disaster. When I landed the only thing I felt was foolish. Sabbaths also don’t become uncomfortable when you’ve been wearing them all day. I took out the insoles to examine them and noticed triangular impressions running along the outside from the midfoot to the heel. This is for stability. The indentations give the insole a sturdier feel, providing a better base for your feet. My only complaint here is related to my high arches as I was greedily seeking more support, but it should do for most people.

You’ll notice there are these embossed, synthetic-coated panels on the eyelets. These panels delay the eyestay region from blowing up sooner. This same coating is on the heel and it gives the shoe a cool appearance overall. The coating looks like leather and performs like leather but it isn’t leather. This kind of innovation is what helps beef up this shoe without overdoing it. There isn’t anything here that doesn’t belong.

Bottom Line: If you’re looking for a lightweight flexible vulc skate shoe that won’t rip up on you in a weekend, the Sabbath has your name written all over it. If you want this same shoe to be comfortable and get you noticed by the ladies, the Sabbath won’t let you down. If you see it at the store and only have $70 plus tax in your pocket, that’s all you’ll need to leave with a pair of them. If you prefer a high profile shoe with all kinds of bells and whistles, the Sabbath is not for you. You will be disappointed.

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